Gov. Malloy Seeks $3.2 Billion In Federal Aid After Sandy

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Flooded Water Street in South Norwalk during Hurricane Sandy. Gov. Dannel Malloy is requesting $3.2 billion in federal aid for infrastructure improvements.
Flooded Water Street in South Norwalk during Hurricane Sandy. Gov. Dannel Malloy is requesting $3.2 billion in federal aid for infrastructure improvements. Photo Credit: Alfred Branch

NORWALK, Conn. – Connecticut will request $3.2 billion from the federal government to help pay for state infrastructure improvements after Hurricane Sandy, Gov. Dannel Malloy announced Thursday.

The state is requesting $2.5 billion for upgrading the “power transmission systems; replacing and hardening for current infrastructure; relocating power lines underground and establishing micro-grids” in some heavily populated areas. Additionally, the state is seeking another $620 million, most of which would go to municipalities, for “prevention and mitigation measures,” such as improving sewage treatment plants and seawalls.

Connecticut sustained more than $1 billion in damages over the past 18 months from Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Irene, this month’s nor’easter and a severe snowstorm in late October 2011.

“Changing weather patterns are a reality, and we must assume that the worst Mother Nature can throw at us hasn’t happened yet. This funding would allow us to invest in a few areas that would put us in a better position to handle the inevitable when it occurs,” Malloy said in a statement.

Malloy is working with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on the funding request because the two states are “tied together economically, culturally and historically,” and together serve a population of more than 23 million people.

“It would allow us to revamp our power distribution system by expanding the use of microgrids and burying power lines in high density areas,” Malloy added. “It would give us the chance to fortify our coastline in a way that will protect us from future flooding while doing nothing to diminish the beauty of our coastline.

"And it would give us the ability to mitigate future environmental damage by investing in the sewage treatment plants that spill over into Long Island Sound with disturbing regularity during weather-related events.”

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