Stamford Cab Drivers Shocked By Slaying Of One Of Their Own

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Taxi drivers are shocked at the killing of Stamford Taxi driver Mahomed Kamal, 47, early Wednesday on Doolittle Road. From left are: Israel Estiverne, Adrien Civil, Lubin Fragilaire and Jean For. They are at the Stamford train station.
Taxi drivers are shocked at the killing of Stamford Taxi driver Mahomed Kamal, 47, early Wednesday on Doolittle Road. From left are: Israel Estiverne, Adrien Civil, Lubin Fragilaire and Jean For. They are at the Stamford train station. Photo Credit: Frank MacEachern

STAMFORD, Conn. -- The killing of Stamford Taxi driver Mahomed Kamal, 47, in what police said was a bloody struggle early Wednesday has shocked other taxi cab drivers in the city.

"It can be me, it can be anyone," said Lubin Fragilaire, 59, of Stamford, as he looked at other taxi drivers waiting in line at the Stamford train station Wednesday afternoon, Aug. 27.

Kamal's body was found at 8:30 a.m. outside the residence of 150 Doolittle Drive in the Westover section of Stamford. Police said there was a struggle both inside and outside the cab and that Kamal suffered several stab wounds. The cab was found in a wooded area nearby. Police said the knife has not been found, and they are looking for a suspect.

Adrien Civil, who has been a taxi driver for nine years, remembered Kamal as a fine man.

"He was a very nice man. He was very gentle and very respectful," Civil said.

Fargilaire, 59, who has been driving full time since 2010, said his thoughts are with Kamal's family after the shocking slaying. 

The two men were joined by fellow taxi drivers Israel Estiverne and Jean For in remembering their friend.

Estiverne, 65, from Stamford, who has been driving for 17 years, said he has had some bad experiences in his cab in the past but nothing life threatening.

Dor, from Derby, who has been driving for three months in Stamford but drove previously in Westport, said the risk is always in the back of his mind, especially during a nighttime call.

"When you pick someone up, you don't know what's going to happen," Dor said.

The four men who work out of the Stamford train station said they feel more secure working there than they would working at night picking people up all over the city.

There was no one available at the Stamford Taxi office to comment on Kamal, his work or his death on Wednesday afternoon, said an employee at the business at 80 Harvard Ave.

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